LYDFORD BULLETIN

LD +18           Wednesday 8 April 2020   Week three – Daily Peep

Still reminiscing:

Saturday 8 April 2012  at Milford Haven in the ‘good ship’ Lucinda.

The plan was to stay 24 hours and then carry on to Pwllheli but once more we were storm bound as it blew a hooley for three days and we were not able to sail until the 10th. It was Easter weekend but the place was deserted, the weather was so grim. The sun was warm when it shone and the nights were cold. There was a very large Welsh chap whom we chatted with more than once, but I was a bit confused when the Marina Staff referred to him as Miss Maisie. Only later did I discover that they called people by the names of their boats. I suppose if Paul had decided to settle there they would have called him Lucinda.  Not sure he would have taken kindle to that.  

Back to the real world:

Clout still cast. Very busy day in the garden pricking out tiny tomato plants, planting more potatoes (second earlies) and sanding the much neglected Summer House – it was in the garden when we came here and must now be well over 50 years old. We have moved it twice; the first time halfway up the lawn on rollers. The second time dismantled and re-assembled. Last year I tried turning it into a potting shed. I would like a potting shed, but it was not a success – wrong location, light not good enough, doors in the wrong place – so now back to being a summer house again. It should have been re-painted about 5 years ago. Tomorrow perhaps, having been sanded, Marion will let herself loose with the paint brush. I think we have had the paint for 5 years in readiness. I have to re-putty all the windows and am not looking forward to that, but with Lockdown no putty and no Linseed oil so that will have to wait. The soil is quite moist further down yet I would not say no to a little rain in the next week or so.

I usually have my haircut every four weeks. I am booked in for next Tuesday, not that that will happen I am sure. So far Lockdown has not been long enough to go critical. It soon will have been and I wonder how many other people are in a similar boat.

We are looking for a replenishment of solids tomorrow thanks to the good offices of a friend. Perhaps as time goes on I shall find a use for all that Vodka which we practically never drink. A niece suggested Long Island cold tea = vodka, gin, tequila, rum and triple sec into a large (1.5l) jug, and add lime juice to taste. Sounds good except no tequila (every house should have a bottle surely??) and the only rum we have is Bacardi which may not work. I wouldn’t get much done I suspect.

On that happy note I shall turn my mind to something else.

Andrew                       lydfordbulletin@topp.myzen.co.uk

LD +17           Tuesday 7 April 2020   Week three – Daily Peep

More than enough of the mock dementia test. If you hadn’t guessed, the questions were  designed to trick us into giving quick wrong answers instead of stopping to think. I reckon I scored about 60/40 but decline to say which figure is for correct answers.

Friday 7 April 2012 heading for Milford Haven in the ‘good ship’ Lucinda.

With just two people, overnight watches can seem long. We settled for 3 hour watches …. which is more than long enough on a chilly night in an open cockpit trying to steer a course and be alert for passing ships. Having come off watch at midnight I was back on 0300 to 0600. I got cold. I struggled at times to keep my eyes open. I was not seasick, not at any time again on the trip, and could from then on happily fry up and eat bacon butties with Lucinda rolling all over the place. I was pleased all the same when we made it into Milford Haven passing through a huge lock into the harbour and marina. We went ashore for an Indian. We were both shattered and the first time I have known Paul not do a meal justice.

Back to the real world:

Today was warm enough for me to cast my clout, though it would be foolish to ignore the old adage and best to wait until May is out; after all, there was a frost last night. When we first moved here I asked the Met Forecaster at Yeovilton what was the normal latest for frost so that I would know when to plant out my runner beans – 17 May he said. For 25 years that held true, but more recently it has been all over the place and surprisingly later frosts than that are no longer uncommon. Very sensibly, my beans are still in their packet. Temperatures will be back to normal by the weekend, I expect the birds will cope. I am told that the first House Martens are here as are Swallows – is that early, I really don’t know. And the beautiful melodious song of the Blackcap has been heard, though not in my garden.

Of course this Friday is Good Friday and so those who normally have their bins emptied on a Friday needs must wait until Saturday – thank goodness the refuse is still being collected says he, fingers crossed.

We still have a coal fire. This means that the grate has to be cleared each day at the moment. When I was a boy my mother always did it before breakfast and I used to think why did she not have breakfast first. I eventually found out. If I wait until after breakfast it gets overtaken by events and is still there accusingly (even if hidden by the fire screen) later in the day and then it becomes an unwelcome chore. Mother you were right; before breakfast is best.

Semolina for pudding tonight. Marion saw the box lurking in the cupboard and hey presto. Now that does take me back to school dinners. As for the toss-up between Victoria Sponge and dumplings – we instead had dumplings and cold tea loaf. Excellent on both counts but if I had to choose – cold tea loaf with plenty of butter. I hear that the price of milk paid to farmers has dropped through the floor due to lack of demand and some farmers are having to throw it away. I thought milk was rationed by the supermarkets only a few weeks ago. I have no idea what the situation is now.

Andrew                       lydfordbulletin@topp.myzen.co.uk

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